1796 $2.50 Stars MS (PCGS# 7647)


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Lot Description
1796 Capped Bust Right Quarter Eagle. Stars on Obverse. HBCC-3003, BD-3. Rarity-5+. MS-63 * (NGC). Here is another coin for the ages, epitomizing the quality of our present sale. It combines high quality, wonderful pedigree and great rarity. What more could be desired?<br /> <br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This fabulous 1796&nbsp;Stars on Obverse is a lustrous and somewhat prooflike example of one of the classic rarities in the quarter eagle series. Bright yellow-gold surfaces with a decided olive cast. Nicely struck overall with just a touch of weakness at the precise centers, and amazingly free of planchet adjustment marks or other unsightly blemishes. Long overshadowed by its more famous counterpart of the year, the 1796 No Stars quarter eagle rarity, the 1796 With Stars, as offered here, saw a mintage of just 432 pieces, less than half that of the 1796 No Stars quarter eagle.<br /> <br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Regarding the ultra-low mintage of this important rarity, the Bass-Dannreuther reference on early gold issues notes: "This is a very rare date/major variety with most numismatists favoring an estimated mintage of 432, these probably comprising the delivery of January 14, 1797. This number is a guess, but the relative rarity of this variety to the No Stars type certainly leads one to believe that it is fairly accurate."<br /> <br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The same reference remarks that perhaps just 40 to 50 examples of the&nbsp;issue are currently accounted for in all grades. Obverse stars 8 left, 8 right, 16 all told, a number that reflects Tennessee&rsquo;s admission to the Union in 1796. With 16 obverse stars, the 1796 quarter eagle is effectively a one-year type -- as is its No Stars counterpart; all other quarter eagles of the type, 1797-1807, have 13 obverse stars. Also of note is a patch of heavy raised die file or polish marks at the reverse rim at the tops of the letters TATE in STATES, clearly visible to the unassisted eye.<br /> <br /> &nbsp;&
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