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SERIES: (None)
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1792 25C J-13 (Special Strike)

PCGS #:
11036
Diameter:
Designer:
Joseph Wright
Weight:
Edge:
Plain
Mintage:
Unknown
Metal Content:
White Metal
Auction Record:
$376,000 • NGC XF45 • 1-7-2015 • Heritage
Condition Census (Explain)
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS64 estimated grade  

Century - Chase Manhattan Bank Museum - ANS Specimen

Lenox Lohr -

Q. David Bowers sells Lohr collection in Fixed Price List -

Hazen B. Hinman buys coin from Bowers circa 1961 -

Paramount’s Century Collection Sale 4/1965:53, $4,500 -

Chase Manhattan Bank Museum of Money -

American Numismatic Society received this as a gift when the Chase Manhattan Bank Museum of Money closed

1 MS64 estimated grade  

New York Historical Society Specimen #1

Unknown benefactor -

New York Historical Society

1 MS64 estimated grade  

New York Historical Society Specimen #2

Unknown benefactor -

New York Historical Society
4 AU50 estimated grade  

Seavey-Norweb Specimen

George Seavey -

W. Elliott Woodward’s 16th Sale 4/1867:882 -

Unknown owner -

Henry Chapman’s 3/1930:44 -

Unknown owner -

New Nertherlands Coin Co. -

Mrs. R. Henry Norweb purchased privately on 6/17/1955 from New Netherlands -

Bowers and Merena 11/1988:3396, $28,600

5 VF35 estimated grade  

George F. Seavey (Descriptive Catalog, 1873), #844, described as fine; Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - Henry Chapman 3/1930:44 - J.C. Morgenthau 10/1935:295 - New Netherlands, sold privately on 6/17/1955 - Norweb Collection - Bowers & Merena 11/1988:3396, $28,600 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5512, $376,000

Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS64 estimated grade  

Century - Chase Manhattan Bank Museum - ANS Specimen

Lenox Lohr -

Q. David Bowers sells Lohr collection in Fixed Price List -

Hazen B. Hinman buys coin from Bowers circa 1961 -

Paramount’s Century Collection Sale 4/1965:53, $4,500 -

Chase Manhattan Bank Museum of Money -

American Numismatic Society received this as a gift when the Chase Manhattan Bank Museum of Money closed

1 MS64 estimated grade  

New York Historical Society Specimen #1

Unknown benefactor -

New York Historical Society

1 MS64 estimated grade  

New York Historical Society Specimen #2

Unknown benefactor -

New York Historical Society
4 AU50 estimated grade  

Seavey-Norweb Specimen

George Seavey -

W. Elliott Woodward’s 16th Sale 4/1867:882 -

Unknown owner -

Henry Chapman’s 3/1930:44 -

Unknown owner -

New Nertherlands Coin Co. -

Mrs. R. Henry Norweb purchased privately on 6/17/1955 from New Netherlands -

Bowers and Merena 11/1988:3396, $28,600

5 VF35 estimated grade  

George F. Seavey (Descriptive Catalog, 1873), #844, described as fine; Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - Henry Chapman 3/1930:44 - J.C. Morgenthau 10/1935:295 - New Netherlands, sold privately on 6/17/1955 - Norweb Collection - Bowers & Merena 11/1988:3396, $28,600 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5512, $376,000

David Hall: There are four known examples of the 1792 quarter pattern struck in white metal. The Norweb coin (called VF35 in the auction, but we think it's better than that) brought $28,600 in November, 1988.

 


P. Scott Rubin: The 1792 Quarter is the only pattern design created by George Washington’s choice for first Chief Engraver of the Mint, Joseph Wright. Wright died in 1793 in one of the smallpox outbreaks that were all too common in 18th century Philadelphia.

Many believe Wright’s quarter pattern to be the most beautiful early coins of the United States Mint. It is also believed that Wright used is wife as the model for the obverse of the coin. Only one of the four known white metal specimens is in private hands.

The 1792 Quarter Dollar struck in white metal (Judd-13) is a coin that has a known population of only four specimens. These can be divided into two groups one group stuck with a plain edge without a collar and the second is also plain edge but with a collar. There are two known coins in each group. The without collar strikes are represented by a coin now in the collection of the American Numismatic Society and one last owned by the Norweb family and sold in 1988. The strikes with collar have been together possibly since there striking and are now in the collection of the New-York Historical Society.

The New-York Historical Society coins were discovered in 2002, they were not recognized as 1792 patterns when they were put on display by the Society, dealer and colonial expert Anthony Terranova asked to be able to examine the specimens after their appearance in an exhibit of medals and with the help of Stack’s and Michael Hodder they verified their validity. The reverse is slightly rotated on one of these two specimens.