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SERIES: Lincoln Cents 1909-1958
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1931-S 1C, RD (Regular Strike)

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PCGS MS66+RD

PCGS MS66+RD

PCGS MS66RD
PCGS #:
2620
Diameter:
19.00 millimeters
Designer:
Victor David Brenner
Weight:
3.11 grams
Edge:
Plain
Mintage:
866,000
Metal Content:
95% Copper, 5% Tin and Zinc
Auction Record:
$5,520 • PCGS MS66 • 1-7-2004 • Heritage
Rarity and Survival Estimates (Explain)
Grades Survival
Estimate 
Numismatic
Rarity 
Relative Rarity
By Type 
Relative Rarity
By Series 
All Grades 8,000 R-3.4 90 / 143 TIE 90 / 146 TIE
60 or Better 8,000 R-3.4 90 / 143 TIE 90 / 146 TIE
65 or Better 2,750 R-4.4 70 / 143 TIE 70 / 146 TIE
Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS66RD PCGS grade
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS66RD PCGS grade
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  
1 MS66RD PCGS grade  

Jaime Hernandez: The 1931-S is the second lowest mintage in the entire Lincoln cent series. The mintage of the 1931-S Linoln cents were revealed soon after they were struck and those who knew about the low mintage, would usually hoard the coins.

 
Consequently, since the early 1930's the coins became very scarce in circulation. In fact, during that time some collectors reported finding a 1909-S V.D.B. Lincoln cent in circulation, but they never found a 1931-S.
 
Because of  it's low mintage and all of the hoarding, the 1931-S Lincoln cent can be purchased in uncirculated grades fairly easy. The monetary spread between grades of this coin is very thin. In circulated grades it trades at very close premiums and in MS60 to MS64 grade examples can also be purchased for just about the same price.
 
Walter Breen indicates that an individual by the name of Maurice Sharlack single handedly acquired a hoard of 200,000 Uncirculated 1931-S Lincoln cents.
 
Circulated coins to MS64 coins can be purchased without much trouble. In MS65 grades, they are less common but still obtainable. The ultimate grade is MS66 and possibly no more than 100 examples exist in this grade or higher. Many of the MS66’s are of average quality. Finding an MS66 of high end quality or better, will definitely require a lot of searching. As of this writing, there are no MS67’s in existence and there probably never will be.

Ron Guth: According to a notice in the June 1934 issue of The Numismatist (p. 416), collectors could still purchase Uncirculated 1931-S Cents for "the face value of the coins and an amount sufficient to cover the mail charrges by first-class mail."