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SERIES: Lincoln Cents 1909-1958
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1915 1C, BN (Proof)

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PCGS PR67BN

PCGS PR67BN

PCGS PR67BN
PCGS #:
3321
Diameter:
19.00 millimeters
Designer:
Victor David Brenner
Weight:
3.11 grams
Edge:
Plain
Mintage:
1,150
Metal Content:
95% Copper, 5% Tin and Zinc
Auction Record:
$10,575 • PCGS PR67 • 4-23-2014 • Heritage
Rarity and Survival Estimates (Explain)
Grades Survival
Estimate 
Numismatic
Rarity 
Relative Rarity
By Type 
Relative Rarity
By Series 
All Grades 250 R-6.6 4 / 18 4 / 18
60 or Better 250 R-6.6 4 / 18 4 / 18
65 or Better 100 R-8.0 5 / 18 TIE 5 / 18 TIE
Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 PR67BN PCGS grade  
1 PR67BN PCGS grade  
3 PR66+BN PCGS grade

MPLs – Lincolns of Color (PCGS Set Registry)

4 PR66BN PCGS grade
4 PR66BN PCGS grade
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 PR67BN PCGS grade  
1 PR67BN PCGS grade  
3 PR66+BN PCGS grade

MPLs – Lincolns of Color (PCGS Set Registry)

4 PR66BN PCGS grade
4 PR66BN PCGS grade
4 PR66BN PCGS grade
4 PR66BN PCGS grade  
4 PR66BN PCGS grade  
4 PR66BN PCGS grade  
4 PR66BN PCGS grade  

Ron Guth:  

The 1915 Lincoln Cent is very scarce as a Matte Proof, especially with full Red color.  By 1915, interest in Matte Proofs waned and the number of coins sold decreased steadily until they were discontinued after 1916.  Collectors simply did not warm up to the unusual finish on Matte Proofs.  

In 1915, the Mint made 1,150 Matte Proofs, down from a high of 4,118 Matte Proofs in 1910.  

The key to value and desirability with Matte Proofs is a combination of color and spotting.  The redder the color and the cleaner the surfaces, the more valuable the coin.