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SERIES: Buffalo Five Cents 1913-1938
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1928-D 5C (Regular Strike)

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PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66
PCGS #:
3964
Diameter:
21.20 millimeters
Designer:
James Earle Fraser
Weight:
5.00 grams
Edge:
Plain
Mintage:
6,436,000
Metal Content:
75% Copper, 25% Nickel
Auction Record:
$17,250 • NGC MS67* • 1-3-2012 • Heritage
Rarity and Survival Estimates (Explain)
Grades Survival
Estimate 
Numismatic
Rarity 
Relative Rarity
By Type 
Relative Rarity
By Series 
All Grades 12,500 R-2.9 43 / 69 TIE 44 / 72 TIE
60 or Better 4,000 R-4.2 52 / 69 TIE 53 / 72 TIE
65 or Better 600 R-5.8 35 / 69 TIE 35 / 72 TIE
Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
1 MS66 PCGS grade  

David Hall: The 1928-D is a little less common in lower circulated grades than the dates that follow. It is scarce in grades EF40 and above. Interestingly, in mint state condition it is more common than either the 1928 or 1928-S. In fact, it is the most abundant mint state Buffalo nickel of the 1913 to 1930 era save for the very common 1913 Type 1. Apparently a good number of original uncirculated rolls were saved at the time of issue. In Gem MS65 condition, strike is sometimes a problem and the 1928-D is tougher to find than the 1928. And in Superb Gem MS66 condition, the 1928-D is quite rare. Luster is of the satiny semi-frosty type.