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SERIES: Capped Bust Half Dollars 1807-1839
LEVEL: Minor Variety or Die Variety

1825 50C Overton 116 (Regular Strike)

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PCGS MS64

PCGS MS63

PCGS AU58
PCGS #:
39663
Diameter:
32.50 millimeters
Designer:
John Reich
Weight:
13.50 grams
Edge:
Lettered: FIFTY CENTS OR HALF A DOLLAR
Mintage:
2,943,166
Metal Content:
89.2% Silver, 10.8% Copper
Auction Record:
$11,163 • NGC MS64 • 8-10-2016 • Heritage
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Condition Census (Explain)
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS65 estimated grade  
1 MS65 PCGS grade  
3 MS64 PCGS grade

Dr. Charles Link Collection

3 MS64 estimated grade  
3 MS64 estimated grade  
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS65 estimated grade  
1 MS65 PCGS grade  
3 MS64 PCGS grade

Dr. Charles Link Collection

3 MS64 estimated grade  
3 MS64 estimated grade  

Ron Guth: Overton 116 is one of the more generic varieties of 1825.  It is semi-scarce but can be found with relative ease in most grades.  The PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census of the top ten examples starts at MS 63, is filled with mostly MS64's, and tops out at MS65.  In fact, we know of only one MS65 example -- the one that sold for just shy of $10,000 in an early 2016 Heritage sale.  Of additional notes is an NGC MS64 Prooflike example that set an even higher price record of $11,162.50 in mid-2016.  Walter Breen listed three different Proof examples of this variety, but we have yet to confirm the existence of even a single example.  For instance, Breen called two of the coins in his list "unverified" and, in fact, his second example, supposedly in the collection of John Jay Pittman, turned out to be non-existent.  We'll keep looking!