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SERIES: Indian Head $2 1/2 1908-1929
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1914 $2.50 (Regular Strike)

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PCGS MS66

PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65
PCGS #:
7946
Diameter:
18.00 millimeters
Designer:
Bela Lyon Pratt
Weight:
4.18 grams
Edge:
Reeded
Mintage:
240,000
Metal Content:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Auction Record:
$103,500 • PCGS MS67 • 3-24-2010 • Heritage
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Rarity and Survival Estimates (Explain)
Grades Survival
Estimate 
Numismatic
Rarity 
Relative Rarity
By Type 
Relative Rarity
By Series 
All Grades 15,666 R-2.8 2 / 15 2 / 15
60 or Better 10,000 R-3.0 2 / 15 2 / 15
65 or Better 105 R-7.9 3 / 15 3 / 15
Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS67 PCGS grade  

Atherton Family Collection - Heritage 3/2010:2184, $103,500

2 MS66 PCGS grade  
2 MS66 PCGS grade
4 MS65+ PCGS grade
5 MS65 PCGS grade
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS67 PCGS grade  

Atherton Family Collection - Heritage 3/2010:2184, $103,500

2 MS66 PCGS grade  
2 MS66 PCGS grade
4 MS65+ PCGS grade
5 MS65 PCGS grade
5 MS65 PCGS grade
5 MS65 PCGS grade  
5 MS65 PCGS grade  
5 MS65 PCGS grade  
5 MS65 PCGS grade  
David Akers (1975/88): In terms of overall rarity, the 1914 is the second rarest issue of the series, only slightly less rare than the lower mintage, higher priced 1911-D. However, in gem condition, i.e. MS-65 or better, the 1914 may well be just as rare as the 1911-D and there are some who feel it may indeed be even more rare. In my experience the 1914 is available a little more often in MS-65 than the 1911-D but one is more likely to find a superb 1911-D (there are a few around) than a superb 1914 (are there any?).

The typical 1914 is very sharply struck with above average luster for the series. Some specimens show evidence of die buckling near the rims but most do not. The surfaces are nearly always very finely granular and the color is most often a light to medium greenish yellow gold. However, a number of examples also exist that a light rose or coppery color.