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SERIES: Jefferson Five Cents 1965 to Date
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

2005-D 5C Speared Bison (Regular Strike)

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PCGS MS66

REVERSE DETAIL

PCGS MS66
PCGS #:
84159
Diameter:
21.20 millimeters
Designer:
Joe Fitzgerald/Jamie Franki
Weight:
5.00 grams
Edge:
Plain
Mintage:
Unknown
Metal Content:
75% Copper, 25% Nickel
Auction Record:
$1,265 • PCGS MS66 • 2-3-2010 • Heritage
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Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS67 PCGS grade  
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS67 PCGS grade  
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS66 PCGS grade
Jaime Hernandez: In 2005, the U.S. Mint resurrected the bison reverse design on the Jefferson nickel.

That same year, there were several coins discovered which contained a large die gouge. The die gouge is very noticeable and it can easily be seen running through the bison's back.

The coins containing this die gouge were referred to as a Speared Bison nickel. Within a couple of days from when the coins were discovered, they were immediately selling for well over $100 raw or in any condition.

Despite the coins being from the year 2005, they still tend to be found in low mint state grades. Coins in MS65 grade are challenging to locate to say the least. In grades of MS66 or higher they become extremely difficult to find.

The coins poor condition can be blamed mainly on the coin planchets in which they were struck, since the planchets usually contained large die gouges, nicks and scratches. Other times the coins display an uneven color and luster, which were probably caused by incorrectly mixing the different metal alloys used to produce the planchets.