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SERIES: Indian Head $5 1908-1929
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1911 $5 (Regular Strike)

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PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65

PCGS MS65
PCGS #:
8520
Diameter:
21.60 millimeters
Designer:
Bela Lyon Pratt
Weight:
8.24 grams
Edge:
Reeded
Mintage:
915,000
Metal Content:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Auction Record:
$23,500 • PCGS MS65 • 7-27-2013 • Stack's/Bowers
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Rarity and Survival Estimates (Explain)
Grades Survival
Estimate 
Numismatic
Rarity 
Relative Rarity
By Type 
Relative Rarity
By Series 
All Grades 32,166 R-2.6 21 / 24 TIE 21 / 24 TIE
60 or Better 20,666 R-2.7 21 / 24 TIE 21 / 24 TIE
65 or Better 135 R-7.6 19 / 24 TIE 19 / 24 TIE
Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  
6 MS65 PCGS grade  
6 MS65 PCGS grade  
6 MS65 PCGS grade  
6 MS65 PCGS grade  
6 MS65 PCGS grade  
David Akers (1975/88): The 1911 is one of the most common issues of the type, and examples in the MS-60 to 63 range are obtainable with some regularity. In MS-64, however, the 1911 is rare but still obtainable with some searching. True gems are very difficult to find and superb quality pieces, although a few do exist, are nearly impossible to locate. Note: Only the 1908 can be found in MS-65 on a fairly regular basis. Although "common" by the standards of this extremely "difficult" series, the 1911 is certainly not common in gem condition in any absolute sense.

Like the quarter eagle of the same date, the 1911 half eagle is usually not really well struck, particularly on the obverse where some of the feathers in the headdress are weak. The surfaces are typically quite granular and the lustre is only good at best, never radiant. Color is generally light to medium yellow or greenish yellow gold but some pale orange gold examples are also known.