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SERIES: Indian Head $5 1908-1915
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1914 $5 (Proof)

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PCGS PR67+

PCGS PR67

PCGS PR66
PCGS #:
8545
Diameter:
21.60 millimeters
Designer:
Bela Lyon Pratt
Weight:
8.24 grams
Edge:
Reeded
Mintage:
125
Metal Content:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Auction Record:
$111,625 • PCGS PR67 • 11-5-2015 • Stack's/Bowers
Rarity and Survival Estimates (Explain)
Grades Survival
Estimate 
Numismatic
Rarity 
Relative Rarity
By Type 
Relative Rarity
By Series 
All Grades 59 R-8.4 3 / 8 TIE 3 / 8 TIE
60 or Better 57 R-8.4 3 / 8 TIE 3 / 8 TIE
65 or Better 25 R-9.0 3 / 8 TIE 3 / 8 TIE
Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 PR67 PCGS grade
1 PR67 PCGS grade  
1 PR67 PCGS grade  
1 PR67 PCGS estimated grade  

Abe Kosoff, circa 1970 - Sam Bloomfield (purchased prior to 1979) - Sam and Rie Bloomfield Foundation Collection - Sotheby's 12/1996:53, $20,900 - Tacasyl Collection - Bonham’s 9/2013:1016, $93,600

3 PR66 PCGS grade
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 PR67 PCGS grade
1 PR67 PCGS grade  
1 PR67 PCGS grade  
1 PR67 PCGS estimated grade  

Abe Kosoff, circa 1970 - Sam Bloomfield (purchased prior to 1979) - Sam and Rie Bloomfield Foundation Collection - Sotheby's 12/1996:53, $20,900 - Tacasyl Collection - Bonham’s 9/2013:1016, $93,600

3 PR66 PCGS grade
3 PR66 PCGS grade
3 PR66 PCGS grade
3 PR66 PCGS grade  
3 PR66 estimated grade  

Dr. Robert Loewinger Collection - Heritage 1/2007:3135, $51,750

10 PR65 PCGS grade  

Ron Guth: The Proof 1914 Half Eagle is very rare.  Perhaps two-thirds of the original mintage of 125 Proofs has survived and approximately forty to fifty examples have been certified.  The matte finish is fragile, thus it is difficult to find top-quality specimens.  The grades seen most frequently on coins of this date are PR64 and PR65, with equal populations at each level.  PR66 examples are extremely rare, and PR67's exist but are rarely encountered.

The best advice for collectors is to look for examples that have not been dipped out -- such coins will have a pale, almost white-ish color.  Traditionally, the dipping has been done to remove copper toning spots, which some collectors find objectionable.  However, there is a rising number of collectors who favor coins with original, unmolested "crust."  These are coins that are truly "as made" and which have been spared the various methods of "improving" a coin's grade.