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SERIES: Silver Commemoratives
LEVEL: Year, MintMark, & Major Variety

1938 50C New Rochelle (Regular Strike)

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PCGS MS68+

PCGS MS68

PCGS MS68
PCGS #:
9335
Diameter:
30.60 millimeters
Designer:
Gertrude K. Lathrop
Weight:
12.50 grams
Edge:
Reeded
Mintage:
15,266
Metal Content:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Auction Record:
$19,550 • NGC MS68* • 7-27-2002 • Heritage
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Rarity and Survival Estimates (Explain)
Grades Survival
Estimate 
Numismatic
Rarity 
Relative Rarity
By Type 
Relative Rarity
By Series 
All Grades 13,000 R-2.9 84 / 144 TIE 84 / 144 TIE
60 or Better 10,000 R-3.0 88 / 144 TIE 88 / 144 TIE
65 or Better 6,000 R-3.8 98 / 144 TIE 98 / 144 TIE
Condition Census (Explain) Show more rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS68+ PCGS grade
2 MS68 PCGS grade
2 MS68 PCGS grade  
2 MS68 PCGS grade  
2 MS68 PCGS grade  
Condition Census (Explain) Show fewer rows
Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS68+ PCGS grade
2 MS68 PCGS grade
2 MS68 PCGS grade  
2 MS68 PCGS grade  
2 MS68 PCGS grade  
2 MS68 PCGS grade  
7 MS67+ PCGS grade
7 MS67+ PCGS grade
7 MS67+ PCGS grade
7 MS67+ PCGS grade

David Hall: The New Rochelle was a somewhat contrived issue. It was authorized in 1936, struck in 1937, and had a date of 1938. Whatever the intent of its issue, it is a beautiful design and it is quite popular with collectors today. The original mintage was 25,015 coins and the issue price was a relatively high $2.00. Apparently New Rochelles were subject to above average care in minting and handling as nearly all specimens are very high grade. The average grade is MS64 to MS66. Superb Gem MS67 specimens aren't really rare either. In fact, this issue is scarce in MS63 and for all practical purposes unknown in circulated grades.

The typical New Rochelle has frosty surfaces and is well struck. Minor abraisions are the only problem usually encountered. There are a few specimens that have semi-prooflike surfaces.